Innovations in environmental governance: Governing for less in Asia, Australia, Europe and the USA

The built environment is exceedingly impacted by and key in addressing climate change. It holds the potential to significantly reduce global carbon emissions. And, it allows for doing so in a cost-effective way. Aiming to utilize this potential and to improve the built environment public and private actors all over the world collaborate in new governance arrangements such as building labelling, partnerships of property owners and governments, and networks of landlords and tenants. Can such arrangements promote an effective advancement of the sustainability and resilience of the built environment?

While new governance has achieved much praise, limited insight exist as to the extent that new governance arrangements indeed are as successful as anticipated. By linking theory and practice this research aims to unravel the criteria for successful new governance arrangements, using a range of unique case studies from Australia, the Netherlands, the United States, India and Singapore.


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Governing urban sustainability and resilience: Innovative tools and new roles for government, business and civil societyInnovative technology and a smart use of traditional technologies, as well as ongoing insights in how we can change the way we use buildings, infrastructures and cities for the better are only two aspects of improving urban sustainability and resilience. In this book Dr. Jeroen van der Heijden addresses the third and perhaps most critical aspect of achieving a meaningful transition towards cities that are less harmful to the natural environment, are less dependent on finite resources, and can better withstand man-made hazards and climate risks. He argues that governments, businesses and civil society groups and individuals need to take up new roles in the governance for urban sustainability and resilience.

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